Working groups and platforms

Website will be updated in due course with details for each working group. If you would like to know more please contact us with the working group name in the query title. The co-leads for each group and platform can be found here.

  • Working Group Renal
  • Working Group Cardiac and metabolic
  • Working Group Pulmonary and systemic vasculature
  • Working Group Lung fibrosis
  • Working Group Mental health, neurology, brain
  • Working Group Intensive care
  • Working Group Immunology
  • Working Group Airways disease bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis
  • Working Group Rehabilitation, sarcopenia, fatigue
  • Platform Data hub
  • Platform Public patient involvement
  • Platform Imaging alliance -Thoracic
  • Platform Outbreak bioresource
  • Platform Imaging alliance C-MORE

Working Group Renal

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • David Thomas

    Lead

    Imperial College London

  • Nigel Brunskill

    Lead

    University of Leicester

    University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

  • Chris Laing

    Lead

    Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

  • Sharlene Greenwood

    Lead

    King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

  • Susan Francis

    Lead

    The University of Nottingham

Working Group Cardiac and metabolic

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Simon Heller

    Lead

    The University of Sheffield

  • Gerry McCann

    Lead

    University of Leicester

    British Heart Foundation

    National Institute for Health Research

  • Mark Toshner

    University of Cambridge

    Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Stefan Neubauer

    University of Oxford

    Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Betty Raman

    University of Oxford

  • Naveed Sattar

    University of Glasgow

  • Rubina Ahmed

    Stroke Association

  • Charalambos Antoniades

    University of Oxford

  • Robert Bell

    University College London

  • Colin Berry

    University of Glasgow

  • John Greenwood

    University of Leeds

  • Aroon Hingorani

    University College London

  • Alun Hughes

    University College London

  • Jamil Mayet

    Imperial College London

  • Nicholas Mills

    The University of Edinburgh

  • David Newby

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Athanasios Saratzis

    University of Leicester

  • Ajay Shah

    King's College London

  • Catherine Sudlow

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Bryan Williams

    University College London

  • Alastair J Moss

    University of Leicester

  • Keith Channon

    University of Oxford

  • Elizabeth Robertson

    University of Glasgow

    Diabetes UK

  • Jonathan Valajbhji

    Imperial College London

  • Partha Kar

    Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust

  • Steve Bain

    University of Swansea

  • Alan Stitt

    Queen's University Belfast

  • Claudia Langenberg

    University of Cambridge

  • Bob Young

    Salford Royal Foundation Trust

  • Desmond Johnston

    Imperial College London

  • Helen Atkins

    University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

  • Khalida Ismail

    King's College London

  • Paul McArdle

    University of Birmingham

  • John Petrie

    University of Glasgow

  • Kamini Shah

    Diabetes UK

  • John Dennis

    University of Exeter

  • Andrew McGovern

    University of Exeter

  • Nilesh Samani

    University of Leicester

    British Heart Foundation

  • Kamlesh Khunti

    University of Leicester

  • Shannon Amoils

    British Heart Foundation

  • Cecilia Poil

    NIHR Office for Clinical Research Infrastructure

Working Group Pulmonary and systemic vasculature

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Mark Toshner

    Lead

    University of Cambridge

    Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Luke Howard

    Lead

    Imperial College London

  • Jane Mitchell

    Imperial College London

  • Allan Lawrie

    The University of Sheffield

  • Cathie Sudlow

    The University of Edinburgh

  • James M Wild

    The University of Sheffield

  • Lasserson Daniel

    University of Warwick

  • Naveed Sattar

    University of Glasgow

  • Roger Thompson

    The University of Sheffield

  • Martin Wilkins

    Imperial College London

  • Olivia Leavy

    University of Leicester

  • Philip Chowienczyk

    King's College London

  • Zoe McIntyre

    University of Cambridge

  • Jennifer Rossdale

    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Working Group Lung fibrosis

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Gisli Jenkins

    Lead

    The University of Nottingham

    Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

  • Joanna Porter

    Lead

    University College London

  • John Simpson

    Newcastle University

  • Joseph Jacobs

    University College London

  • Jim (James) Wild

    The University of Sheffield

  • Kenneth Baillie

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Rachel Chambers

    University College London

  • Chris Coleman

    The University of Nottingham

  • Peter George

    Royal Brompton Hospital

  • Ian Hall

    The University of Nottingham

  • Ling-Pei Ho

    University of Oxford

  • Jane Mitchell

    Imperial College London

  • Philip Molyneaux

    Imperial College London

  • John E Pearl

    University of Leicester

  • Malcolm (Calum) Semple

    University of Liverpool

  • Iain Stewart

    The University of Nottingham

  • Louise V Wain

    University of Leicester

  • Aron Walsh

    Imperial College London

  • Elizabeth Hufton

    The University of Nottingham

  • Richard Allen

    University of Leicester

  • Nazia Chaudhuri

    Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

  • Pilar Rivera Ortega

    Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

  • Michael Gibbons

    Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Trust

  • John Blaikley

    The University of Manchester

  • Mark Spears

    University of Glasgow

  • Laura Fabbri

    The University of Nottingham

  • Fasih Khan

    The University of Nottingham

  • Shaney Barratt

    University of Bristol NHS Trust

  • Neil Hanley

    The University of Manchester

  • Chris Brightling

    University of Leicester

  • Mark Jones

    University of Southampton

  • David Thickett

    University of Birmingham

  • Raminder Aul

    St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Bibek Gooptu

    University of Leicester

  • Karen Piper Hanley

    The University of Manchester

  • Louise Wright

    The University of Nottingham

  • Simon Johnson

    The University of Nottingham

  • Krisnah Poinasamy

    Asthma UK

    British Lung Foundation

  • Samantha Walker

    Asthma UK

    British Lung Foundation

Working Group Mental health, neurology, brain

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Matthew Hotopf

    Lead

    King's College London

  • John Geddes

    Lead

    University of Oxford

    Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • David Burn

    Lead

    Newcastle University

  • Trudie Chalder

    King's College London

  • Jonathan Cavanagh

    University of Glasgow

  • Thomas Kabir

    McPin Foundation

  • Lea Milligan

    Mental Health MQ

  • Rubina Ahmed

    Stroke Association

  • Richard Francis

    Stroke Association

  • Hannah Dobson

    Alzheimer’s Research UK

  • Michael Sharpe

    University of Oxford

  • Paul Harrison

    University of Oxford

  • Kate Saunders

    University of Oxford

  • Kamaldeep Bhui

    University of Oxford

  • Ivan Koychev

    University of Oxford

  • David Clark

    University of Oxford

  • Masud Husain

    University of Oxford

  • John Pimm

    Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust

  • Anthony David

    University College London

  • Tim Nicholson

    King's College London

  • Carmine Pariante

    King's College London

  • Anne Lingford-Hughes

    Imperial College London

  • Richard Morriss

    The University of Nottingham

  • Jonathan Evans

    University of Bristol

  • Ed Bullmore

    University of Cambridge

  • Louise Allan

    University of Exeter

  • Clive Ballard

    University of Exeter

  • Kathryn Abel

    The University of Manchester

  • Bill Deakin

    The University of Manchester

  • Hamish McAllister-Williams

    Newcastle University

  • Stella-Maria Paddick

    Newcastle University

  • David Baldwin

    University of Southampton

  • Gemma Simons

    University of Southampton

  • Nathan Huneke

    University of Southampton

  • Matthew Broome

    University of Birmingham

  • Thomas Jackson

    University of Birmingham

  • Rachel Upthegrove

    University of Birmingham

  • Elspeth Guthrie

    University of Leeds

  • Max Henderson

    University of Leeds

  • Brent Elliott

    Barts Health NHS Trust

  • Ania Korszun

    Queen Mary University of London

  • Elizabeta Mukaetova-Ladinska

    University of Leicester

  • Terry Brugha

    University of Leicester

  • Ian Jones

    National Centre for Mental

    HealthCardiff University

  • Cherie Armour

    Queen's University Belfast

  • Parisa Mansoori

    NIHR Office for Clinical Research Infrastructure

  • Simon Wessely

    King's College London

  • Akram Hosseini

    Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

  • Clare Mackay

    University of Oxford

Working Group Intensive care

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • John Simpson

    Lead

    Newcastle University

  • Matthew Rowland

    Lead

    University of Oxford

  • Danny McAulay

    Lead

    Queen's University Belfast

  • Anthony Rostron

    Lead

    Newcastle University

Working Group Immunology

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Peter Openshaw

    Lead

    Imperial College London

  • Paul Moss

    Lead

    University of Birmingham

  • Tracey Hussell

    Lead

    The University of Manchester

  • Janet Lord

    University of Birmingham

  • Peter Openshaw

    Imperial College London

  • Paul Moss

    University of Birmingham

  • Tracey Hussell

    The University of Manchester

  • Calum Semple

    University of Liverpool

  • Kenneth Baillie

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Louise V Wain

    University of Leicester

  • Rachael Evans

    University of Leicester

  • Helen Baxendale

    Royal Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

  • William Schwaeble

    University of Cambridge

  • Jonathan Luke Heeney

    University of Cambridge

  • Sarah L Rowland-Jones

    The University of Sheffield

  • Lance Turtle

    University of Liverpool

  • Sarah Walmsley

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Paul Klenerman

    University of Oxford

  • Ryan Thwaites

    Imperial College London

  • Danny Altmann

    Imperial College London

Working Group Airways disease bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Liam Heaney

    Lead

    Queen's University Belfast

    Belfast Health & Social Care Trust

  • Antony De-Soyza

    Lead

    Newcastle University

  • Chris Brightling

    University of Leicester

  • Krisnah Poinasamy

    Asthma UK

    British Lung Foundation

  • Samantha Walker

    Asthma UK

    British Lung Foundation

  • Anthony Rostron

    Newcastle University

  • Paul Pfeffer

    Queen Mary University of London

  • Salman Siddiqui

    University of Leicester

  • John Hurst

    Imperial College London

  • James Chalmers

    University of Dundee

  • Petr Novotny

    University of Leicester

  • Omer Elneima

    University of Leicester

  • Aziz Sheikh

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Elizabeth Sapey

    University of Birmingham

  • Jennifer Quint

    Imperial College London

  • Anna Hansell

    University of Leicester

Working Group Rehabilitation, sarcopenia, fatigue

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • William Man

    Lead

    Imperial College London

  • Janet Lord

    Lead

    University of Birmingham

  • Janet Scott

    Lead

    University of Glasgow

  • Neil Basu

    Lead

    University of Glasgow

  • Sally Singh

    Lead

    University of Leicester

    University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

  • Charlotte Bolton

    Lead

    The University of Nottingham

    Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

  • Trudie Chalder

    Lead

    King's College London

  • Neil Basu

    University of Glasgow

  • Daisy Wilson

    University of Birmingham

  • Paul Greenhaff

    The University of Nottingham

  • Dan Wilkinson

    University of Birmingham

  • Neil Greening

    University of Leicester

  • Maya Buch

    The University of Manchester

  • Miles Witham

    Newcastle University

  • Hector Chinoy

    The University of Manchester

  • Rachael Evans

    University of Leicester

  • Zudin Puthucheary

    Queen Mary University of London

  • Mick Steiner

    University of Leicester

  • Pedro Machado

    University College London Hospitals

  • Trudie Chalder

    King's College London

  • Beadsworth Mike

    Liverpoool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Defres Sylviane

    Liverpoool University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Anne McArdle

    University of Liverpool

  • Jonathan Cavanagh

    University of Glasgow

  • Louise Sigfrid

    University of Oxford

  • Sally Singh

    University of Leicester

  • Gail Carson

    University of Oxford

Platform Data hub

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Annemarie Docherty

    Lead

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Ewen Harrison

    Lead

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Aziz Sheikh

    Lead

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Kenneth Baillie

    Lead

    The University of Edinburgh

  • Robert Free

    Lead

    University of Leicester

Platform Public patient involvement

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Kate Holmes

    Lead

    NIHR Office for Clinical Research Infrastructure

  • Sam Walker

    Lead

    Asthma UK

    British Lung Foundation

  • Louise Wright

    The University of Nottingham

  • Lea Milligan

    Mental Health MQ

  • Rubina Ahmed

    Stroke Association

  • Richard Francis

    Stroke Association

  • Hannah Dobson

    Alzheimer’s Research UK

  • Elizabeth Robertson

    University of GlasgowDiabetes UK

  • Steve Jones

    Action for Pulmonary Fibrosis

  • Wendy Adams

    Action for Pulmonary Fibrosis

  • Sara Imariso

    Alzheimer’s Research UK

  • Fatima Sulaiman

    Blood Cancer UK

  • Shannon Amoils

    British Heart Foundation

  • Lucy Allen

    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

  • Aisling Macmahon

    Kidney Research UK

  • Jo Pywell

    Kidney Research UK

  • Thomas Kabir

    McPin Foundation

  • Vanessa Pinfold

    McPin Foundation

  • Kate Adcock

    Muscular Dystrophy UK

  • Sarah Rudkin

    Versus Arthritis

Platform Imaging alliance -Thoracic

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Joseph Jacobs

    Lead

    University College London

  • Fergus Gleeson

    Lead

    University of Oxford

  • Jim (James) Wild

    Lead

    The University of Sheffield

  • Salman Siddiqui

    Lead

    University of Leicester

Platform Outbreak bioresource

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Hayley Hardwick

    Lead

    University of Liverpool

  • Bill Greenhalf

    Lead

    University of Liverpool

  • Calum Semple

    Lead

    University of Liverpool

  • Louise V Wain

    Lead

    University of Leicester

Platform Imaging alliance C-MORE

The Renal working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection on:

  1. kidney function in patients with previously normal renal function and
  2. the general health of patients already living with kidney disease

We will build on preliminary biochemical and radiological findings that suggest that the kidney injury is a common feature of COVID-19. We will also try to design interventions e.g. surveillance of kidney function and rehabilitation strategies in patients affected by COVID-19.

The PHOSP Cardiovascular working group includes experts in cardiovascular research and medicine and related disciplines. The backbone membership and coordination of the group is provided by the NIHR-BHF Cardiovascular Partnership, which brings together cardiovascular researchers from across research centres funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The Cardiovascular Partnership has identified a small number of “Covid-19 Cardiovascular Disease Flagship Projects”, some of which are embedded within the PHOSP core workplan.

The metabolic working group aims to determine why those with diabetes are at increased risk of mortality and severe COVID-19 infection. The group will design and undertake analyses from the PHOSP COVID database but also incorporate ongoing analyses from large national databases, where appropriate.

This working group aims to quantify and then characterise the extent and severity of the consequences of Covid on lung and systemic vasculature. In particular, COVID is known to result in thrombosis during the acute illness, but we do not know whether this will result in chronic thromboembolic complications. We shall use primarily physiology and imaging to assess the long-term effects of COVID on the circulation. Results from an early analysis of data will inform decisions regarding further integration with biobanked samples. We also aim to set up a randomised study of anticoagulation for incidental pulmonary embolism at follow up where equipoise exists regarding therapy.

The Lung Fibrosis working group will describe the incidence of interstitial lung disease (ILD)/ lung fibrosis in survivors of COVID-19 following hospitalisation and the impact of post-COVID-19 ILD on physiology, function, and quality of life. The group will define resolving and progressing phenotypes and determine the predictors of outcome. Using various techniques, we will determine the key drivers of ILD in these patients to identify potential therapies.

The PHOSP Brain Working Group brings together a wide range of researchers, clinicians and charities who want to investigate the long term effects of COVID on mental, cognitive and neurological health – and to explore how these effects are related to individual patient characteristics and whole body health. The core membership and coordination of this group are provided by the NIHR Mental Health and Dementia Translational Research Collaborations, which bring together leading experts, research infrastructure and facilities from across the UK. We will study patient reported symptoms, assess cognitive function and use brain imaging techniques including MRI. Our objective is to identify factors that relate to longer term problems, identify the mechanisms involved and then to develop interventions and treatments that improve patient outcomes.

The PHOSP-COVID Intensive Care working group aims to investigate and quantify the long-term outcomes in patients with severe COVID-19 infection admitted to critical care. The group will build on preliminary findings from the first wave of the pandemic that patients have a higher relative mortality than other ICU conditions, and increased risk of readmission and healthcare costs. We will also investigate mechanisms behind the findings that patients from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations and lower socioeconomic status are over-represented, compared to similar cohorts with non-COVID critical illness. Working with an multidisciplinary research team and ICU patient representatives, we will try to understand mechanisms determining differing trajectories of recovery also try to design interventions e.g. rehabilitation strategies and therapeutic interventions to improve the severity of post-ICU symptoms in this group.

Who are the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group?

PHOSP-COVID is a UK research consortium funded by the government to explore the short to long term sequelae of COVID-19 in people who were hospitalised. It aims to build an integrated clinical and research pathway to tackle persisting symptoms in those who have been in hospital with COVID. The Airways Disease group is a group of experts with skills and track record in airways disease, health informatics and clinical research. They represent centres across the UK caring for patients with long COVID.

What is long COVID?

Long COVID is a collection of symptoms affecting multiple body systems and functions including breathing, mental health, joints and skin, often accompanied by fatigue or reduced energy levels which are experienced by some after suffering acute COVID illness.

Research priorities in long COVID and airways disease

To better understand where research on long COVID and airways disease should focus, the PHOSP-COVID Airways Disease group in partnership with Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation have received around 300 proposed research questions from over 50 international experts in airways disease and COVID. The group is now collating and refining these questions, which will then go through a process to select the top priority research projects. The views of people with newly diagnosed or pre-existing airway diseases will be incorporated by running a parallel exercise involving patients. The combined results will then inform funders and healthcare researchers on the most pressing research questions in the field of long COVID and airways disease. The results from this joint international prioritisation exercise is planned for publication by early 2021.

The rehabilitation working group aims to determine the long-term effects of COVID-19 on physical and psychological functioning, and to develop interventions that help patients recover from the deleterious effects of COVID-19.

The sarcopenia working group aims to determine the role that sarcopenia plays in poor long term outcomes of COVID-19 survivors. It will compare muscle mass, strength and physical functioning in patients who were hospitalised and made either good recoveries or poor recoveries. It will use a range of techniques to determine the drivers of sarcopenia in these patients in order to identify potential therapies.

The fatigue group aims to examine bio-psycho-social predictors of fatigue post COVID-19 infection, at 3, 6 and 12 months prospectively. This will help inform the development of targeted interventions.

Patient and public involvement is an important part of the PHOSP-COVID study.

The PHOSP Charity Group consists of a wide range of charities who work with the PHOSP Executive Board and subject-specific Working Groups to ensure that the patient voice is taken into account at all stages of the study. Charities are participating members of the Working Groups where they provide expertise and can help to ensure research priorities reflect those of patients and the public. As the study progresses, charities will work closely with the PHOSP team to ensure key messages are shared with patients and the public.

The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group aims to develop the infrastructure to a) collect and anonymise chest x-rays and computed tomography imaging and computed tomography reports for patients in PHOSP-COVID and b) then allow linkage of imaging data with separately held clinical data. The Thoracic Imaging Steering Group will also perform baseline quantitative analyses of collected chest imaging, the results of which will have value for other groups in PHOSP-COVID.

  • Stefan Neubauer

    Lead

    University of Oxford

    Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

  • Betty Raman

    Lead

    University of Oxford

  • Claire Bloomfield

    Lead

    University of Oxford

  • Mark Halling-Brown

    Lead

    Royal Surrey NHS Foundation Trust